Can You Dodge A Bullet Fired At You?

Dodge a bullet: Theoretically, there might be a very small possibility to avoid harm if a variety of circumstances and variables go in your favour. However, it is virtually difficult to avoid a bullet under the real-world circumstances.

Dodging bullets appears to be the popular idea that popular culture, and especially action movies, are most in love with. Usually, when the bad guy shoots at the hero of the story, the latter easily avoids the bullet because he is the protagonist. Maybe you can picture the hero’s smug expression.

Although it appears very implausible, there are moments when we have to doubt what we formerly considered to be impossible. Although it might be amazing, practising it would probably be risky.

Response Time

If you enjoy sports, you’ve probably heard the phrase “response time” at least a few times. A measure of how soon you “respond” to a specific visual or physical stimuli, reaction time is a physiological response to an external stimulus. Reaction time is a crucial aspect in cricket, particularly when it comes to fielding; a fielder is regarded as fearsome if they have quick reflexes.

This is applicable to all facets of life; it is not just to sports; having quick reflexes is a very helpful quality.

The time that passes from the moment a ball is hit by the batsman until it is caught by the fielder is relatively little (going into hundredths of a second! ), so having a “excellent” response time typically suggests that a person has a very short or low reaction time. It is without a doubt an uncommon and outstanding skill to react precisely in so little time!

Dodging ‘Normal’ Things

What things do you now consider to be “normal”? It can be challenging to define what constitutes normalcy, but since we’re talking about avoiding things, let’s come up with some criteria that items must meet in order to qualify for inclusion on the list of things that are considered to be normal.

First and foremost, we need large objects, or at least those that can be seen well from a few dozen metres away. It shouldn’t then be moving at a speed at which you can’t even notice it, much less get ready to avoid it. There must to be a means for you to get the hint to move, even if it is swiftly approaching you. There are other additional prerequisites, but because we’re discussing bullets, those are the only things that catch our attention.

Many problems can be avoided safely and some are relatively simple to avoid if you follow the aforementioned rules. When thrown by a person, little objects like a basketball, tennis ball, or even a small stone can be evaded just as readily as large objects like chairs, gallons of milk, and someone else’s pet charging at you (it happens!).

Dodging a Bullet

It’s an extremely risky practise to begin with. The reason is… well, it should be clear.

A bullet fails to meet both of the standards for “regular” items that we previously mentioned because it is really small and moves…well, too damn quickly! Can you avoid a bullet, only for the sake of argument?

Okay, sure. But there are several conditions attached to that “yes,” therefore it is not a generalisation that holds true in all circumstances.

There are several firearms, bullets, and shooting speeds.


There are countless different sorts of guns available, and each one uses a different variety of bullets. The size, speed, and momentum of each of those bullets differ greatly as a result, which is only normal.

The muzzle velocity is the rate at which a bullet leaves a gun. As I previously mentioned, various firearm types have distinct muzzle velocity that can range from 120 metres per second to 1200 metres per second. For the purposes of this discussion, let’s assume that a bullet travels at an average speed of about 750 metres per second (2740 kilometres per hour), which is in the middle of the range.

Observing the Bullet Leave the Gun


It’s a crazy struggle to avoid something that is flying through the air at that speed! There are several risky factors working against you in this situation. For instance, you’ve probably seen in movies how quickly bullets shoot out of a gun’s muzzle.

Although it appears that way in movies, it doesn’t actually happen that way in real life. As a result, your visual abilities won’t be of much use to you when trying to avoid a bullet.

What then is the additional feature of a fired bullet that can be perceived by humans and does so in fact?

The sound of a bullet being fired


Although you might not be able to see a bullet leave the pistol, you can hear the crack as it is shot (provided. they are not using a silencer). But don’t think for a moment that you can just step aside politely as a bullet hurtles toward you (you have to be Neo from The Matrix to accomplish that). You have to take the speed of sound itself into account for that to even be a chance of redemption.

While the average speed of the bullet we are examining is 750 metres per second, the speed of sound through air is 343 metres per second.

When a result, the bullet will hit you before you even hear the gun’s crack as it is fired because its speed is greater than the speed of sound itself. Think about that for a time…

Is it Completely Impossible?

Okay, no. It is not absolutely impossible to avoid being hit with a bullet with the optimum circumstances (which are extremely rare to occur in real life). In actuality, this was proven on the television programme Mythbusters.


They demonstrated that a person cannot avoid a gunshot at a distance of 500 yards (about 450 metres) even with the fastest reaction time of 490 milliseconds since the bullet hits the person before they hear the “crack.” At 500 yards, one can see the flash, and with the same amount of time to react, one can avoid the bullet.

Even so, the circumstances of this demonstration were very well orchestrated; they used a particular blank cartridge that made a bright flash and was fired at the subject from a precise distance, with the subject fully aware that he would be shot at. But in reality, this is not at all feasible.

It is therefore accurate to state that you cannot avoid a genuine bullet in reality. I’ve said it, there!